Instructions for Cleaning a Bar Stool

It’s astonishing how much force is required to do harm. A sharp fall to the floor may leave a stool unharmed, yet a seemingly innocuous tap against the corner of a countertop can result in a chip in the finish!

To figure out why this happens from event to incident, you’d need a lab full of physicists, structural, and chemical engineers. (To put it another way, it will remain a mystery.) In any case, the easiest approach to avoid damage is to use caution when using your bar stools.

DO NOT USE STEP STOOLS AS BAR STOOLS.
DON’T knock your bar stools over.
DON’T spin wildly in the seat of your swivel stool.
DO NOT slam your bar stool into the wall, the counter, the bar stools next to you, or any other object in the room.
DO NOT allow anyone to sit on your bar stools who is heavier than the maximum weight limit. (I apologize, Uncle Bubba.)
DO NOT lay your entire weight on the footrest of the bar stool. (Unless it has a metal frame that is totally welded.) They’re generally up to the task.)

DO pay attention to the care requirements for your specific material type listed below.

Wooden Bar Stools: How to Take Care of Them

Cleaning should be done with a mildly moist towel on a daily basis. Use the softest, lint-free cloth you can find and room temperature water. (Rough towels may leave fine scratches on your wood’s surface.) Wipe in the direction of the wood grain whenever possible. Wipe up any remaining wetness with a dry, soft, lint-free cloth to complete the cleaning.

Soaps and cleaners should not be used on your wood on a daily basis. To achieve the best clarity on your bar stools, you can use a wax-free product like Murphy’s Oil Soap (DILUTED HEAVILY – roughly 2 drops in a big bowl of room temperature water) or another wax-free & silicone-free wood cleaner on occasion if thorough cleaning is required. Before using such items, read the labels!

If you want to polish the surface of your wood, apply it sparingly (once every 3 to 6 months, at most, depending on use). Pledge and other wax-based polishes should not be used. (Over time, they’ll leave a waxy residue.)

Wood, no matter how expensive or high-quality your bar stool is, is still a porous material. Remember, its purpose in nature is to move water up trees, not to be used as furniture! It CAN be scraped, dented, and soiled. Heat, cold, humidity, moisture, and direct sunlight all have an impact on wood.

Avoid exposing your wood to extremes of temperature, such as ice-cold drink glasses, extremes of heat, such as hot soup bowls, and direct exposure to heat and air conditioning vents, as well as excessive sunshine.

Also, liquid spills should not be left on your wood for long periods of time. Failure to follow these guidelines can result in wood discoloration, swelling, and/or cracking, among other things.

If you must write with pens or pencils on your barstool, use a pad under your paper and avoid dragging rough and/or pointy objects (such as plates and silverware) across your wood surfaces

Even if your wood bar stool has been varnished with a quality catalyzed varnish, you need still to take precautions to safeguard your surfaces. There is no such thing as indestructible furniture!

Metal Bar Stools: How to Care for Them

Cleaning should be done with a mildly moist, soft, lint-free cloth on a daily basis. Wipe up any remaining wetness with a dry, soft, lint-free cloth to complete the cleaning. If required, clean thoroughly with a light dish detergent diluted with water. If you leave soap residue on the metal, it will form a greasy build-up that will attract dirt and grime.

Powder-coated metal paints are the most lasting coatings utilized in the furniture industry, but nothing is unbreakable, as we’ve already started! You can ruin the finish of any painted surface if you hit or scrape it hard enough, regardless of the furniture’s quality level.

Hand-applied metal finishes (such as those that imitate brushed steel or antique/weathered metal) are more susceptible to scratches, chipping, and wear than powder coats, therefore more caution should be used with these.

 

Fabric Upholstery: How to Care for It

Each fabric type has a different washing process that is designated by a “cleaning code.” Prior to cleaning, determine the cleaning code for your cloth. If you require support, please contact us. The following is a list of the codes and the cleaning procedures that correlate to them:

W is the code (water-based cleaners are recommended)

Frequent vacuuming or light brushing to remove dust and grime is suggested to prevent general soiling. Spot clean with a water-based cleaning agent, such as a mild detergent or non-solvent upholstery shampoo, utilizing only the foam. In a circular motion, apply foam using a soft rag or brush. When completely dried, vacuum. Always test a tiny area first before moving on.

S is the code (solvent-based cleaners are recommended)

Frequent vacuuming or light brushing to remove dust and grime is suggested to prevent general soiling. Use a gentle water-free solvent or a dry cleaning product to spot clean. (These cleaners usually have aerosol-type dispensers and are designated as “S” cleaners on their package.) Only clean in a well-ventilated area and avoid using any products that contain the highly poisonous carbon tetrachloride. Always test a tiny area first before moving on.

WS is the code (either water-based or solvent-based cleaners are recommended)

Frequent vacuuming or light brushing to remove dust and grime is suggested to prevent general soiling. Spot clean with a gentle solvent, upholstery shampoo, or mild detergent foam. Follow the instructions carefully before using a solvent or dry-cleaning product, and clean only in a well-ventilated area. Pretest a tiny area before starting with either procedure.